The American Heart Association (AHA) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) today announced the start of a new multi-year collaborative initiative supported by founding sponsors Boehringer Ingelheim, Eli Lilly and Company (Lilly), and Novo Nordisk. The initiative’s goal is to help people with type 2 diabetes reduce their risk of disability and death due to cardiovascular events such as heart attack and stroke. Additional support for the initiative is provided by national sponsor, Sanofi.

The American Heart Association—the world’s leading voluntary organization dedicated to building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke—announced today research grants totaling more than $28 million to the scientific teams that will create a new research network focused on understanding the causes of atrial fibrillation (AFib). The new knowledge they discover will provide a basis to generate more effective ways to treat and prevent the disease.

The American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease, and Aramark, the largest U.S. food service company serving two billion meals each year, are thrilled their Healthy for Life® 20 By 20 collaboration is the 2018 Silver Halo Award winner in the health category.

In-hospital, guideline-led care will now reach more hospitals, and even more people in China. The American Heart Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease, supported by funding from AstraZeneca, is seeking to expand in-hospital cardiovascular care guideline adherence through the Improving Care for Cardiovascular Disease in China project, a collaborative effort with the Chinese Society of Cardiology.

Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers, affecting approximately 68,000 adults in the United States each year. Bladder cancer occurs in men more frequently than it does in women and usually affects older adults, though it can happen at any age.

Each year in the U.S., more than 300,000 people have heart surgery. To reduce risk of stroke for their patients, surgeons often will close the left atrial appendage, which is a small sac in the left side of the heart where many blood clots form, during these surgeries. Mayo Clinic researchers report today in JAMA that adding this procedure is likely the right choice for certain patients but not all.