Jackie L. Boucher, MS, RDN, is the recipient of the American Diabetes Association’s® (ADA’s) 2018 Outstanding Educator in Diabetes award. This award recognizes a distinguished health professional who has made outstanding educational efforts in the field of diabetes and has demonstrated significant contributions to the understanding of diabetes education.

Prion diseases are slow degenerative brain diseases that occur in people and various other mammals. No vaccines or treatments are available, and these diseases are almost always fatal. Scientists have found little evidence of a protective immune response to prion infections. Further, microglia - brain cells usually involved in the first level of host defense against infections of the brain - have been thought to worsen these diseases by secreting toxic molecules that can damage nerve cells.

Increased levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in your blood can be a sign of prostate cancer. However, cancer is just one of several possible causes of increased PSA.

Laryngospasm is a spasm of the vocal cords that temporarily makes it difficult to speak or breathe. The vocal cords are two fibrous bands inside the voice box (larynx) at the top of the windpipe (trachea). The onset of a vocal cord spasm is sudden, and just as suddenly, it goes away, usually after a few minutes. The breathing difficulty can be alarming, but it's not life-threatening.

The American Diabetes Association® (ADA) will present the 2018 Outstanding Achievement in Clinical Diabetes Research Award to Rury R. Holman, FMedSci. This award recognizes exceptional contributions in patient-oriented or clinical outcomes research that have had a significant impact on diabetes prevention and treatment. Dr. Holman will be recognized with this honor during the ADA’s 78th Scientific Sessions, June 22-26, 2018, at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando.

Women who experience vaginal bleeding for more than one day during the first trimester of pregnancy may be more likely to have a smaller baby, compared to women who do not experience bleeding in the first trimester, suggest researchers at the National Institutes of Health. On average, full-term babies born to women with more than one day of bleeding in the first trimester were about 3 ounces lighter than those born to women with no bleeding during this time. Additionally, infants born to women with more than a day of first trimester bleeding were roughly twice as likely to be small for gestational age, a category that includes infants who are healthy but small, as well as those whose growth has been restricted because of insufficient nutrition or oxygen or other causes.