The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, has launched a clinical trial of an investigational vaccine designed to protect against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The Phase 1 study will enroll a small group of healthy adult volunteers to examine the safety of an experimental intranasal vaccine and its ability to induce an immune response. The study is being conducted at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, one of the NIAID-funded Vaccine and Treatment Evaluation Units (VTEUs).

Urologists from Mayo Clinic have identified unwarranted variation in post-surgery opioid prescribing patterns and have taken steps to create a standardized approach across Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida and Minnesota. The urologists involved in the study presented their findings today at the 2018 American Urological Association annual meeting in San Francisco.

A first-in-human trial evaluating an experimental treatment for Ebola virus disease has begun at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. The Phase 1 clinical trial is examining the safety and tolerability of a single monoclonal antibody called mAb114, which was developed by scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of NIH, and their collaborators. Investigators aim to enroll between 18 and 30 healthy volunteers aged 18 to 60. The trial will not expose participants to Ebola virus.

On April 13, 2018, the United States intervened in five lawsuits accusing Insys Therapeutics Inc., of violating the False Claims Act in connection with the marketing of Subsys, an opioid painkiller manufactured and sold by Insys, the Department of Justice announced today.  Subsys is a sublingual spray form of fentanyl, a powerful, but highly addictive, opioid painkiller.  In 2012, Subsys was approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of persistent breakthrough pain in adult cancer patients who are already receiving, and tolerant to, around-the-clock opioid therapy.

An injection may one day be able to reverse atherosclerosis, according to emerging research presented at the American Heart Association’s Vascular Discovery: From Genes to Medicine Scientific Sessions 2018, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in vascular biology for researchers and clinicians.

Halena Gazelka, M.D., chair, Mayo Clinic Opioid Stewardship Program, has been appointed by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar to serve on the newly established Pain Management Best Practices Inter-Agency Task Force. Established by the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act of 2016, the task force will identify inconsistencies in pain management best practices among federal agencies and propose solutions to resolve these inconsistencies.