Researchers from the University of Arizona Health Sciences participated in the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study that estimates  1 in 59 children in the United States has been identified as having an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), based on tracking across multiple areas of the nation.

MICHELLE BONDS: We’re joined today by the CDC Director Robert Redfield, as well as, Dr. Lyle Peterson, Director of CDC’s Division of Vector-Borne Diseases. After his remarks, Dr. Redfield has to leave, however, we will be joined by Dr. Peterson, who will be available to answer questions during the Q&A portion of the briefing. I’d like to turn the call over to Dr. Redfield.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), the nation’s leading organization committed to fighting diabetes by driving discovery through research and innovation, by intensifying the urgency around the diabetes epidemic, and by supporting people living with and affected by diabetes, is proud to announce this year’s recipients of the ADA’s National Scientific and Health Care Achievement awards. Individually and collectively, their exemplary leadership, mentorship and many achievements have advanced the field of diabetes care and improved health outcomes for people with diabetes.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), the nation’s leading organization committed to fighting diabetes by driving discovery through research and innovation, by intensifying the urgency around the diabetes epidemic, and by supporting people living with and affected by diabetes, is proud to announce the 2018 recipients of the ADA’s Professional Interest Group awards. Individually and collectively, their exemplary leadership, mentorship and achievements have advanced the field of diabetes care and improved health outcomes for people with diabetes.

A drug combination aimed at preventing transmission of HIV from a pregnant woman to her fetus likely does not increase the risk for preterm birth and early infant death, according to a re-analysis of two studies funded by the National Institutes of Health. The research appears in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Transplanted livers change the profile of blood cells in the recipients, reducing the potential for organ rejection, Mayo Clinic research shows. The findings are published in Kidney International.