Researchers are now able to use induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to form a model of human adult-like cardiac muscle by introducing electric and mechanical stimulation at an early stage. Since this muscle is similar to the adult heart, it could serve as a better model for testing the effects of drugs and toxic substances than current tissue-engineered heart models. The study, performed by scientists at Columbia University, New York City, and funded by the National Institutes of Health, was published today in Nature.

Scientists have developed a novel technique that prevents coronary artery obstruction during transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), a rare but often fatal complication. The method, called Bioprosthetic Aortic Scallop Intentional Laceration to prevent Iatrogenic Coronary Artery obstruction (BASILICA), will increase treatment options for high-risk patients who need heart valve procedures. The findings by researchers at the National Institutes of Health will publish in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: Cardiovascular Interventions on April 2.

Lewy body dementia is the second most common type of progressive dementia after Alzheimer’s disease, but it is underdiagnosed, says Bradley Boeve, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist. A new program among research centers across the country intends to change that.

A $20 million commitment from Eugene and Maxine Rosenfeld will enable UCLA Health Sciences to enhance its ability to provide simulation training to future health care professionals.

Precision medicine for breast cancer is an approach to diagnosis, treatment and prevention that takes into account the genes you're born with (your genetic makeup) and the genes or others markers present within the cancer cells. With this approach, your blood or tumor tissue is collected for analysis, often genetic. The information may help predict or diagnose disease and guide treatment decisions.

Surgery to remove part of the liver sometimes can be a successful treatment for liver cancer, but that’s not always the case. A variety of other options also are available to treat liver cancer. How much the cancer has spread, along with a person’s age and overall health, helps determine the best treatment choice.